Find Your Inner Renaissance Person

Inspiration is found everywhere. When I was a kid, I was crazy for every new craft that I saw and dove into endless projects with enthusiasm and determination. I loved going to the fabric store and the dime store, which carried all sorts of craft supplies. For a short time I was obsessed with making layered jello creations in goblets and clear dishes. During the summer one of the schools had what I remember as a 2 week day camp for making all sorts of stuff. We braided belts, made tiled trivets and woven pot holders. You could also do ceramics and a host of other activities that kept us out of the house and having fun.
I had no problem spending my days in the craft world, or outside playing with my friends. There was never the thought that I should be doing something else, spend my time more wisely or curtail my imagination. As an avid reader I loved adventure stories and tales of overcoming hardship which further fueled my imagination. Schools at the time still taught art and encouraged creative endeavors. My 4th grade teacher loved Mexico and we spent time doing projects about the country and also learning to speak some Spanish.

So what happens as we become adults in the world? Yes, we have to face the reality of working and family and day to day living. But why do we seem to often turn our backs on the creative process, talking ourselves out of trying new things and not allowing our imagination to flow? And more importantly how can we get back to a place where we learn for the joy of it and without expectations or a cluttered mind.

Deepak Chopra talks about mental claustrophobia as one way we prevent ourselves from enjoying the creative process. We tell ourselves we can’t do something before we even get started and are often 10 steps ahead of ourselves and far from being in the present moment. Before even attempting something we let our fears about so many things kill the joy and fun we could be having. We need to find that single mindedness and focus we had has children. So much emphasis is placed on multitasking that I fear it takes away from our ability to be in the moment

Remaining curious as an adult is so important. Not everything that sparks an interest needs to have a permanent place in your life, but being open to learning and trying new things will keep you vibrant, engaged in the world, and a good conversationalist at the very least. Perhaps someone suggests a book and you wonder what on earth you would find interesting about that particular topic. That happened for me when someone suggested I read “The Boys in the Boat”. Other than an appreciation for the grace of the sport, I have never had particular interest in rowing.  But this is one of the best books I have ever read. Yes, I learned a little about rowing, but I also learned a lot about teamwork, about what it takes to make a team, to make a boat, about discipline, about the inner fortitude of an earlier generation that seems lacking in the world these days, and about the Berlin olympics under Hitlers regime. I never expected I would gain so much knowledge and insight from a book about rowers and rowing.

Have you said to yourself more than once that you would love to learn a new language? If the answer is yes or perhaps you are planning a trip to a foreign country and would like to have a basic knowledge of the language, try http://www.Duolingo.com. It is a free language learning website plus they also have an app for your iPad and phone. Lots of choices here including Vietnamese, Turkish, Polish and Portuguese, along with Spanish and Italian. Unlike all the memorization we did in high school language classes, these lessons are short and interactive, allowing you to be as serious, or not, as you want. I’ve been learning Polish on Duolingo and I actually prefer it to Rosetta Stone.

Most college and universities have separate programs for adult learning with some offering day trips or longer excursions. There are usually a wide variety of subjects often taught by one of the college professors. Some meet weekly for several weeks, other for just a time or two. Art institutes or nature centers/botanical gardens also often have one day weekend or evening workshops and/or demonstrations.

Want to give writing a try, but not sure where to start? Give http://www.750words.com words a try. Free for the first month, and only $5 a month after that, the goal is just what the title says. Sit and write 750 words every day. Of course you can go longer than that if you want. They have monthly challenges and also tell you the mood of your writing each day along with words that you repeat often. You can have something specific you want to write or it can just be free flow. I have done both and recommend it highly.

Become a renaissance person! The ideal of the renaissance man who knew a little bit about a lot of things isn’t such a bad thing. Yes, we usually need some sort of expertise in an area so we can earn a living, plus it is nice to have some expertise at a hobby or two. But don’t stop there. The sky is the limit with all the possibilities that exist. Be curious, be open, let go of perfection and have some fun. We need fun in our lives, and while you may decide not to pursue a something after satisfying your curiosity about it, you may be able to inspire someone else who may have an interest in that particular thing.

Here are a couple of other ideas that you may find interesting or helpful.

Read the Mad Man Knitting Blog http://www.madmanknitting.wordpress.com. Gregory Patrick literally knitted himself out of homelessness with his adorable teddy bears. You may learn a little about knitting (actually more about the process of knitting), but what you will learn and be inspired by is his insistence in not remaining in a dark space facing personal challenges and the challenges currently going on in the world around us. Every post I read from him humbles me, makes me grateful, and makes me try harder to be a better person in this world.

Are you a history nut or love adventure stories and/or biographies. Books can inspire us on many levels; to write, to travel, to be braver in our own lives. One book I just finished that did all three for me is Beyond the Call by Lee Trimble with Jeremy Dronfield. Many times the heroes of the world live quiet and unassuming lives. One of these men was Robert Trimble, a world war 2 fighter pilot. While he had an outstanding flying career during the war, the story of the lives he saved in Poland once the camps were liberated by the Red Army, and from right under the ever watchful eyes of the Russians is nothing short of amazing. His family knew very little of his efforts, but as an old man he told his son the story of his covert mission, and Beyond the Call is the book that resulted.  Like the Boys in the Boat, I learned about a wonderful man and hero to many, but also so much more about WW2, our relationship with Russia and an appreciation for what former prisoners endured after their release. While I have an interest in world war 2 history and Poland in particular, you don’t need either to enjoy and be amazed by this man’s story.

2 thoughts on “Find Your Inner Renaissance Person

  1. Pat

    I’m looking forward to trying the duolingo website and 750 words. It’s been awhile but I used to do a word exercise — make a list of 7 non-related words and write a short story using them, it’s fun to do.

    Reply
    1. yogapaula Post author

      Thanks for the short story idea Pat. That sounds like fun and good for stretching the imagination
      also! I hope you enjoy Duolino. I even tried learning a little bit of Turkish, but am sticking mostly
      to Polish.

      Reply

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